Back To The Basics: LED Lights | Mister Sparky East Texas
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Back To The Basics: LED Lights

Back To The Basics: LED Lights

I can remember the first time I picked up a lamp and realized I could not use a regular incandescent light bulb with it. I won’t lie, I was very put-off by the fine print: LED bulbs required. At the time I didn’t know much about LEDs, why the shift toward them or why my incandescent bulbs were getting such a bad reputation in the lighting industry.

In recent years there has been an even greater push to make LEDs the preferred bulb in America. This year it was announced that incandescent bulbs would begin disappearing from shelves in this country. In fact, a great number of countries have stopped producing and selling incandescent bulbs in favor of LEDs and fluorescents.

At Mister Sparky we follow the industry trends, which means that we prefer LEDs and fluorescents over incandescent with any lighting projects we complete in your house. We understand that changing to LEDs can feel strange. What’s so great about them after all?

The best way to explain the outstanding benefits that come with making the switch is by breaking it down. We’ve gathered this information from the U.S. Department of Energy, which serves to explain the benefits of LEDs.

7 LED Facts

1. A light-emitting diode, or LED, is a type of solid-state lighting that uses a semiconductor to convert electricity into light. Today’s LED bulbs can be six to seven times more energy efficient than conventional incandescent lights and cut energy use by more than 80 percent.

2. Good-quality LED bulbs can have a useful life of 25,000 hours or more — meaning they can last more than 25 times longer than traditional light bulbs. That is a life of more than three years if run 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

3. Unlike incandescent bulbs — which release 90 percent of their energy as heat — LEDs use energy far more efficiently with little wasted heat.

4. From traffic lights and vehicle brake lights to TVs and display cases, LEDs are used in a wide range of applications because of their unique characteristics, which include compact size, ease of maintenance, resistance to breakage, and the ability to focus the light in a single direction instead of having it go every which way.

5. LEDs contain no mercury, and a recent Energy Department study (link is external) determined that LEDs have a much smaller environmental impact than incandescent bulbs. They also have an edge over compact fluorescent lights (CFLs) that’s expected to grow over the next few years as LED technology continues its steady improvement.

6. The first visible-spectrum LED was invented by Nick Holonyak, Jr., while working for GE in 1962. Since then, the technology has rapidly advanced and costs have dropped tremendously, making LEDs a viable lighting solution. Between 2011 and 2012, global sales of LED replacement bulbs increased by 22 percent while the cost of a 60-watt equivalent LED bulb fell by nearly 40 percent. By 2030, it’s estimated that LEDs will account for 75 percent of all lighting sales.

7. In 2012, about 49 million LEDs were installed in the U.S. — saving about $675 million in annual energy costs. Switching entirely to LED lights over the next two decades could save the U.S. $250 billion in energy costs, reduce electricity consumption for lighting by nearly 50 percent and avoid 1,800 million metric tons of carbon emissions.